Two's Company, Three's a Crowd: Differences in Dominance Relationships in Isolated Versus Socially Embedded Pairs of Fish

@article{Chase2003TwosCT,
  title={Two's Company, Three's a Crowd: Differences in Dominance Relationships in Isolated Versus Socially Embedded Pairs of Fish},
  author={Ivan D Chase and C. Tovey and Peter Murch},
  journal={Behaviour},
  year={2003},
  volume={140},
  pages={1193-1217}
}
  • Ivan D Chase, C. Tovey, Peter Murch
  • Published 2003
  • Psychology
  • Behaviour
  • Summary We performed experiments with cichlid e sh to test whether several basic aspects of dominance were the same in isolated pairs as in pairs within a social group of three or four. We found that the social context, whether a pair was isolated or within a group, strongly affected the basic properties of dominance relationships. In particular, the stability of relationships over time, the replication of relationships in successive meetings, and the extent of the loser effect were all signie… CONTINUE READING
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