Twitter evolution: converging mechanisms in birdsong and human speech

@article{Bolhuis2010TwitterEC,
  title={Twitter evolution: converging mechanisms in birdsong and human speech},
  author={Johan J Bolhuis and Kazuo Okanoya and Constance Scharff},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2010},
  volume={11},
  pages={747-759}
}
Vocal imitation in human infants and in some orders of birds relies on auditory-guided motor learning during a sensitive period of development. It proceeds from 'babbling' (in humans) and 'subsong' (in birds) through distinct phases towards the full-fledged communication system. Language development and birdsong learning have parallels at the behavioural, neural and genetic levels. Different orders of birds have evolved networks of brain regions for song learning and production that have a… Expand
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