Twitches Versus Movements: A Story of Motor Cortex

@article{Taylor2003TwitchesVM,
  title={Twitches Versus Movements: A Story of Motor Cortex},
  author={Charlotte S. R. Taylor and Charles G. Gross},
  journal={The Neuroscientist},
  year={2003},
  volume={9},
  pages={332 - 342}
}
Modern study of the neurophysiology of the cerebral cortex began with Fritsch and Hitzig's discovery that electrical stimulation of the cortex produces movements. The importance of this discovery was threefold: it was the first demonstration of cortex devoted to motor function, the first indication that the cortex was electrically excitable, and the first evidence of a topographically organized representation in the brain. Fritsch and Hitzig's basic findings were soon replicated by Ferrier, but… 

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