Twenty years of Argentine ants in New Zealand: past research and future priorities for applied management

@article{Ward2010TwentyYO,
  title={Twenty years of Argentine ants in New Zealand: past research and future priorities for applied management},
  author={Darren F Ward and Chris J. Green and Richard J Harris and Stephen B Hartley and Philip J. Lester and Margaret C. Stanley and David Maxwell Suckling and Richard Toft},
  journal={New Zealand Entomologist},
  year={2010},
  volume={33},
  pages={68 - 78}
}
The Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), is a highly invasive global pest. It has been just over twenty years since Argentine ants were fi rst discovered in New Zealand. Through the result of human-mediated dispersal, they are now relatively widespread, but patchily distributed, in many North Island towns and cities, and also in several locations in the South Island. This review provides a short history of Argentine ant invasion within New Zealand and research conducted to date. It… Expand
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The influence of semiochemicals on the co-occurrence patterns of a global invader and native species
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