Twenty-first century advances in knowledge of the biology of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes): a new morphological analysis and moa diagnoses revised

@article{Worthy2012TwentyfirstCA,
  title={Twenty-first century advances in knowledge of the biology of moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes): a new morphological analysis and moa diagnoses revised},
  author={Trevor H. Worthy and R. Paul Scofield},
  journal={New Zealand Journal of Zoology},
  year={2012},
  volume={39},
  pages={153 - 87}
}
Abstract The iconic moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) from New Zealand continue to attract much scientific scrutiny, as they have done since their discovery in the 1840s. Here, we review moa research since 2001 that advances our knowledge of the biology of these families; in particular, their breeding, diet and phylogenetic relationships. Then we perform a phylogenetic analysis based on morphological characters using a broader range of taxa and many more characters than hitherto used in moa analyses… Expand
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