Turtle origins: insights from phylogenetic retrofitting and molecular scaffolds

@article{Lee2013TurtleOI,
  title={Turtle origins: insights from phylogenetic retrofitting and molecular scaffolds},
  author={M S Y Lee},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={26}
}
  • M. S. Lee
  • Published 1 December 2013
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Evolutionary Biology
Adding new taxa to morphological phylogenetic analyses without substantially revising the set of included characters is a common practice, with drawbacks (undersampling of relevant characters) and potential benefits (character selection is not biased by preconceptions over the affinities of the ‘retrofitted’ taxon). Retrofitting turtles (Testudines) and other taxa to recent reptile phylogenies consistently places turtles with anapsid‐grade parareptiles (especially Eunotosaurus and/or… 
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