Turning Points in Labor Migration: The Case of Hong Kong

@article{Skeldon1994TurningPI,
  title={Turning Points in Labor Migration: The Case of Hong Kong},
  author={Ronald Skeldon},
  journal={Asian and Pacific Migration Journal},
  year={1994},
  volume={3},
  pages={118 - 93}
}
  • R. Skeldon
  • Published 1 March 1994
  • Economics
  • Asian and Pacific Migration Journal
The Hong Kong experience of emigration and immigration does not fit neatly into models of migration transition. As a city-state with a small rural population, it has exhibited different developmental characteristics from the larger Asian newly industrialized economies. Geopolitical factors have also played a key role in “patterns” of migration, such as restrictive immigration policies in receiving countries. Also significant are individual considerations of political and economic risk, as… 

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