Turing's Two Tests for Intelligence*

@article{Sterrett2004TuringsTT,
  title={Turing's Two Tests for Intelligence*},
  author={Susan G. Sterrett},
  journal={Minds and Machines},
  year={2004},
  volume={10},
  pages={541-559}
}
  • S. G. Sterrett
  • Published 1 November 2000
  • Computer Science
  • Minds and Machines
On a literal reading of `Computing Machinery and Intelligence', Alan Turing presented not one, but two, practical tests to replace the question `Can machines think?' He presented them as equivalent. I show here that the first test described in that much-discussed paper is in fact not equivalent to the second one, which has since become known as `the Turing Test'. The two tests can yield different results; it is the first, neglected test that provides the more appropriate indication of… 
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