Tunneled Epidural Catheters for Prolonged Analgesia in Pediatric Patients

@article{Aram2001TunneledEC,
  title={Tunneled Epidural Catheters for Prolonged Analgesia in Pediatric Patients},
  author={Laleh Aram and Elliot Krane and Lori J. Kozloski and Myron Yaster},
  journal={Anesthesia \& Analgesia},
  year={2001},
  volume={92},
  pages={1432–1438}
}
UNLABELLED We conducted this retrospective study to document the efficacy and safety, and demonstrate the spectrum of indications for subcutaneously tunneled epidural catheters in the management of prolonged pain in pediatric patients. [...] Key Method The charts of 25 patients with prolonged pain that was unresponsive to conventional opioid therapy (10: end stage malignancy, 8: extensive abdominal surgery, 7: trauma, etc.) and who received thoracic, lumbar, or caudal tunneled epidural catheters between 1995…Expand
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