Tungsten, the Surprisingly Positively Acting Heavy Metal Element for Prokaryotes

@article{Andreesen2008TungstenTS,
  title={Tungsten, the Surprisingly Positively Acting Heavy Metal Element for Prokaryotes},
  author={Jan Remmer Andreesen and Kathrin Makdessi},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={1125}
}
The history and changing function of tungsten as the heaviest element in biological systems is given. It starts from an inhibitory element/anion, especially for the iron molybdenum‐cofactor (FeMoCo)–containing enzyme nitrogenase involved in dinitrogen fixation, as well as for the many “metal binding pterin” (MPT)‐, also known as tricyclic pyranopterin– containing classic molybdoenzymes, such as the sulfite oxidase and the xanthine dehydrogenase family of enzymes. They are generally involved in… 
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