Tumors in long-term rat studies associated with microchip animal identification devices.

@article{Elcock2001TumorsIL,
  title={Tumors in long-term rat studies associated with microchip animal identification devices.},
  author={L E Elcock and Barry P. Stuart and Brad Wahle and Herbert E. Hoss and K Crabb and D M Millard and Robert E. Mueller and Thomas F Hastings and Stephen G. Lake},
  journal={Experimental and toxicologic pathology : official journal of the Gesellschaft fur Toxikologische Pathologie},
  year={2001},
  volume={52 6},
  pages={
          483-91
        }
}
  • L. E. Elcock, B. Stuart, +6 authors S. Lake
  • Published 1 February 2001
  • Medicine
  • Experimental and toxicologic pathology : official journal of the Gesellschaft fur Toxikologische Pathologie
Tumors surrounding implanted microchip animal identification devices were noted in two separate chronic toxicity/oncogenicity studies using F344 rats. The tumors occurred at a low incidence rate (approximately 1 percent), but did result in the early sacrifice of most affected animals, due to tumor size and occasional metastases. No sex-related trends were noted. All tumors occurred during the second year of the studies, were located in the subcutaneous dorsal thoracic area (the site of… 
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