Tularemia as a biological weapon: medical and public health management.

@article{Dennis2001TularemiaAA,
  title={Tularemia as a biological weapon: medical and public health management.},
  author={David T. Dennis and Thomas V. Inglesby and Donald Ainslie Henderson and John G. Bartlett and Michael S. Ascher and Edward M. Eitzen and Annie D. Fine and Arthur M. Friedlander and Jerome Hauer and Marci Layton and Scott R. Lillibridge and Joseph McDade and Michael T. Osterholm and Tara O'Toole and Gerald W. Parker and Trish M. Perl and Philip K. Russell and Kevin Tonat},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2001},
  volume={285 21},
  pages={
          2763-73
        }
}
OBJECTIVE The Working Group on Civilian Biodefense has developed consensus-based recommendations for measures to be taken by medical and public health professionals if tularemia is used as a biological weapon against a civilian population. PARTICIPANTS The working group included 25 representatives from academic medical centers, civilian and military governmental agencies, and other public health and emergency management institutions and agencies. EVIDENCE MEDLINE databases were searched… 

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