Tuberculosis: Past and Present

@article{Burke2011TuberculosisPA,
  title={Tuberculosis: Past and Present},
  author={Stacie D. A. Burke},
  journal={Reviews in Anthropology},
  year={2011},
  volume={40},
  pages={27 - 52}
}
  • S. Burke
  • Published 2011
  • Sociology
  • Reviews in Anthropology
Tuberculosis is an infectious disease with a long and established association with human populations. This review discusses and integrates an ethnographic study of public health fieldwork in the 1990s North American resurgence of tuberculosis and a bioarchaeological evaluation of tuberculosis in antiquity. Based on these works, this article explores a series of useful themes of relevance across anthropology, from microbe, to patient, to social structure, to syndemic. These levels of analysis… Expand
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