Tsetse genetics: contributions to biology, systematics, and control of tsetse flies.

@article{Gooding2005TsetseGC,
  title={Tsetse genetics: contributions to biology, systematics, and control of tsetse flies.},
  author={RON H. Gooding and Elliot S. Krafsur},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2005},
  volume={50},
  pages={
          101-23
        }
}
Tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) constitute a small, ancient taxon of exclusively hematophagous insects that reproduce slowly and viviparously. Because tsetse flies are the only vectors of pathogenic African trypanosomes, they are a potent and constant threat to humans and livestock over much of sub-Saharan Africa. Despite their low fecundity, tsetse flies demonstrate great resilience, which makes population suppression expensive, transient, and beyond the capacities of private and public… 
Tsetse flies: genetics, evolution, and role as vectors.
  • E. Krafsur
  • Biology
    Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases
  • 2009
Tsetse fly evolution, genetics and the trypanosomiases - A review.
  • E. Krafsur, I. Maudlin
  • Biology
    Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases
  • 2018
Current Status of Glossina Population Ecology
TLDR
Glossina population genetics and manipulation of prokaryotic symbiont species may provide avenues for management innovations to confront the intractable problem of trypanosomiasis in Africa.
Glossina hytrosavirus control strategies in tsetse fly factories: application of infectomics in virus management
TLDR
The aim of this PhD research was to investigate the functional and structural genomics and proteomics (infectomics) of GpSGHV as a prerequisite to development of rationally designed viral control strategies.
Ecotype Evolution in Glossina palpalis Subspecies, Major Vectors of Sleeping Sickness
TLDR
It is found that the two subspecies of Glossina palpalis are so divergent that they deserve the species status and how fast ecological divergence can be is highlighted, especially in host-parasite-vector systems.
The tsetse fly Glossina palpalis palpalis is composed of several genetically differentiated small populations in the sleeping sickness focus of Bonon, Côte d'Ivoire.
  • S. Ravel, T. De Meeûs, P. Solano
  • Biology
    Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases
  • 2007
Tsetse Flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) Population in Ethiopia: A Review
Tsetse flies (Glossina) are obligate bloodsucking medical and veterinary important vectors of trypanosome which causes African sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in live stocks. There are 31
Functional analysis of a Midgut Proteolytic Gene in Tsetse Fly (Glossina pallidipes) by RNA Interference
TLDR
Functional analysis of a midgut Glossina proteolytic gene by RNA interference suggests it is crucial to tsetse fly physiology and may contribute to bloodmeal digestion and the results through targeted transcript knockdown together with GPL dual role during trypanosome establishment could provide a foundation for the development of a genetic approach to controltrypanosomiasis.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 100 REFERENCES
Genetic diversity and gene flow in morsitans group tsetse flies.
  • E. Krafsur
  • Medicine
    Tsetse and trypanosomiasis information quarterly
  • 2002
TLDR
A study of tsetse fly population genetics can add anything to the ongoing debate about area-wide control measures and eradication, and can be used successfully to achieve a high degree of control.
Microsatellite Polymorphism in Tsetse Flies (Diptera: Glossinidae)
TLDR
The identification of 13 polymorphic microsatellite loci from Glossina palPalis palpalis Robinean-Desvoidy confirmed that micros satellite markers may be used to examine the subpopulation structure of tsetse flies.
Genetic diversity and gene flow in morsitans group tsetse flies
TLDR
Well developed theory teaches that the exchange of approximately one reproducing fly per generation, on average, is sufficient to prevent fixation of genetic differences between populations, and a study of tsetse fly population genetics can add anything to the ongoing debate.
Tissue distribution and prevalence of Wolbachia infections in tsetse flies, Glossina spp.
TLDR
It is reported here that in colonized flies, Wolbachia infections can be detected in 100% of sampled individuals, while infections vary significantly in field populations.
Population ecology of tsetse.
David J. Rogers and Sarah E. Randolph Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OXI 3PS, England Introduction The tsetse, Glossina, still infests 40% of tropical Africa, a
Characterization of microsatellite markers in the tsetse fly, Glossina pallidipes (Diptera: Glossinidae).
TLDR
Eight new polymorphic microsatellite loci are characterized in Glossina pallidipes, a vector of African trypanosomiasis, by using the primers developed in G. m.
Genetic Aspects of Quality Control in Tsetse Colonies
TLDR
There is little or no evidence for adaptation during the early phases of laboratory colonization of five species of tsetse, but a model is presented indicating that some colonies have existed long enough to have undergone significant changes in the relative numbers of males having “standard” and “enhanced” fitness.
Intraspecific variability in natural populations of Glossina palpalis gambiensis from West Africa, revealed by genetic and morphometric analyses
TLDR
Genetic differentiation was significant on a macrogeographic scale, i.e. between tsetse coming from Senegal and Burkina Faso, and microsatellite loci further allowed differentiation of populations of G. palpalis gambiensis trapped on the same hydrographic network a few kilometres apart.
Tsetse flies
Tsetse flies are bloodsucking flies of the genus Glossina. They occur only in tropical Africa and are important as vectors of African trypanosomiasis in both humans and animals. Sleeping sickness, as
...
...