Truthiness and falsiness of trivia claims depend on judgmental contexts.

@article{Newman2015TruthinessAF,
  title={Truthiness and falsiness of trivia claims depend on judgmental contexts.},
  author={Eryn J. Newman and Maryanne Garry and Christian Unkelbach and Daniel M Bernstein and D. Stephen Lindsay and Robert A. Nash},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2015},
  volume={41 5},
  pages={1337-48}
}
When people rapidly judge the truth of claims presented with or without related but nonprobative photos, the photos tend to inflate the subjective truth of those claims--a "truthiness" effect (Newman et al., 2012). For example, people more often judged the claim "Macadamia nuts are in the same evolutionary family as peaches" to be true when the claim appeared with a photo of a bowl of macadamia nuts than when it appeared alone. We report several replications of that effect and 3 qualitatively… CONTINUE READING

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