True Myths: James Watt's Kettle, His Condenser, and His Chemistry

@article{Miller2004TrueMJ,
  title={True Myths: James Watt's Kettle, His Condenser, and His Chemistry},
  author={D. Miller},
  journal={History of Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={42},
  pages={333 - 360}
}
  • D. Miller
  • Published 2004
  • History
  • History of Science
  • The mythology and iconography of science are currently of great interest to historians. Most historical work concerned with myth still involves exploding it in the manner of John Waller's recent book Fabulous science. Such work holds up an expert account of historical reality against the distortions of myth. I have encouraged the explosion of myth myself in suggesting that the recent flood of popular science history writing, what I have called the "Sobel Effect" literature, insofar as it… CONTINUE READING
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    References

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