• Corpus ID: 78657882

Tropical wound dressing protocols for haemodialysis central venous catheter exit sites: a cross-over randomised controlled trial

@inproceedings{McArdle2015TropicalWD,
  title={Tropical wound dressing protocols for haemodialysis central venous catheter exit sites: a cross-over randomised controlled trial},
  author={Joleen McArdle},
  year={2015}
}
Background: Exit sites of central venous catheters (CVC), often used to deliver haemodialysis, require meticulous care. Staff in a large regional North Queensland Renal Service found the recommended transparent dressing inappropriate because moisture build-up was thought to increase likelihood of infection or dressings not remaining intact. The use of an opaque dressing (used by the Renal Service) contradicted the State-wide infection control guidelines recommended at the time of the study… 

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 69 REFERENCES

A literature review of central venous catheter dressings: implications for haemodialysis in the tropics

Further research is required to determine the most effective dressing type for use on haemodialysis CVC exit sites in the tropics, as limited evidence to suggest infection rates were higher using transparent compared with non-transparent (gauze) dressings.

Audit of factors associated with the intactness of central venous catheter exit site dressings for northern Australian haemodialysis patients

To determine the percentage of opaque dressings currently used for CVC exit sites that remained intact between dialysis episodes, and to explore whether altered dressing integrity is associated with specific demographic or clinical characteristics, a prospective, observational design was used.

Evaluation of a No-dressing Intervention for Tunneled Central Venous Catheter Exit Sites

  • K. OlsonR. Rennie S. Gaudet
  • Medicine
    Journal of infusion nursing : the official publication of the Infusion Nurses Society
  • 2004
This study tested whether central venous catheter-related sepsis could be reduced by removing a hypothesized reservoir for pathogens, the CVC exit site dressing, by randomly assigning individuals to receive either a gauze dressing or no dressing, once their catheter insertion site had healed.

Interventions for preventing infectious complications in haemodialysis patients with central venous catheters.

Mupirocin ointment appears effective in reducing the risk of catheter-related bacteraemia and a lack of high quality data on the routine use of povidone-iodine Ointment, polysporin ointments and topical honey warrant larger RCTs.

Comparison of central venous catheter dressings in bone marrow transplant recipients.

Developing CVC sepsis or tunnel infection in close proximity to the time of CVC surgical placement suggests that factors other than the assigned dressing were associated with the occurrence of C VC-related infection in three cases.

Central venous catheter dressings: a systematic review.

There was no evidence of any difference in the incidence of infectious complications between any of the dressing types compared in this review, and it is unlikely that any of these comparisons would have had sufficient power to detect any differences between groups.

Gauze and tape and transparent polyurethane dressings for central venous catheters.

There was no evidence of any difference in the incidence of infectious complications between any of the dressing types compared in this review and at this stage it appears that the choice of dressing for central venous catheters can be based on patient preference.

Predictors of hemodialysis central venous catheter exit-site infections.

Given the morbidity and mortality associated with CVC infections, more nursing research is needed in this area, and a large number of negative swab culture results were obtained suggesting that further nursing education is needed.

A prospective, randomized study comparing transparent and dry gauze dressings for central venous catheters.

Patients having central venous catheters for three or more days were prospectively randomized to receive a transparent (n = 58) or gauze (n = 57) dressing to compare the incidence of insertion site

Central venous catheters: a review of skin cleansing and dressings.

A literature-based review of the management of central venous catheters, focusing on skin cleansing and dressing types, is offered, showing how proper skin preparation prior to catheter insertion has been shown to be essential in reducing infections.
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