Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change Assessment: Part I: Detection and Attribution

@article{Knutson2019TropicalCA,
  title={Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change Assessment: Part I: Detection and Attribution},
  author={Thomas R. Knutson and Suzana J. Camargo and Johnny C. L. Chan and Kerry A. Emanuel and Chang‐Hoi Ho and James P. Kossin and Mrutyunjay Mohapatra and Masaki Satoh and Masato Sugi and Kevin J. E. Walsh and Liguang Wu},
  journal={Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society},
  year={2019}
}
An assessment was made of whether detectable changes in tropical cyclone (TC) activity are identifiable in observations and whether any changes can be attributed to anthropogenic climate change. Overall, historical data suggest detectable TC activity changes in some regions associated with TC track changes, while data quality and quantity issues create greater challenges for analyses based on TC intensity and frequency. A number of specific published conclusions (case studies) about possible… 

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