Trophic resource partitioning and competition between the two sibling bat species Myotis myotis and Myotis blythii

@article{Arlettaz1997TrophicRP,
  title={Trophic resource partitioning and competition between the two sibling bat species Myotis myotis and Myotis blythii},
  author={R. Arlettaz and N. Perrin and J. Hausser},
  journal={Journal of Animal Ecology},
  year={1997},
  volume={66},
  pages={897-911}
}
1. Niche theory predicts that the stable coexistence of species within a guild should be associated, if resources are limited, with a mechanism of resource partitioning. Using extensive data on diets, the present study attempts: (i) to test the hypothesis that, in sympatry. the interspecific overlap between the trophic niches of the sibling bat species Myotis myotis and M. biythii-which coexist intimately in their roosts-is effectively lower than the two intraspecific overlaps; (ii) to assess… Expand
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