Trigger Points in the Suboccipital Muscles and Forward Head Posture in Tension‐Type Headache

@article{FernndezdelasPeas2006TriggerPI,
  title={Trigger Points in the Suboccipital Muscles and Forward Head Posture in Tension‐Type Headache},
  author={C{\'e}sar Fern{\'a}ndez‐de‐las‐Pe{\~n}as and Cristina Alonso‐Blanco and Mar{\'i}a Luz Cuadrado and Robert D. Gerwin and Juan Antonio Pareja},
  journal={Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain},
  year={2006},
  volume={46}
}
OBJECTIVE To assess the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in the suboccipital muscles and forward head posture (FHP) in subjects with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) and in healthy subjects, and to evaluate the relationship of TrPs and FHP with headache intensity, duration, and frequency. [] Key MethodMETHODS Twenty CTTH subjects and 20 matched controls without headache participated. TrPs were identified by eliciting referred pain with palpation, and increased referred pain with muscle contraction…
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To assess the presence of trigger points in several head and neck muscles in subjects with chronic tension‐type headache and in healthy subjects and to evaluate the relationship of these TrPs with forward head posture, headache intensity, duration, and frequency.
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TLDR
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Differences in cervical musculoskeletal impairment between episodic and chronic tension-type headache
TLDR
Active MTrPs in the craniocervical region contribute to triggering or maintenance of TTH and posture or neck mobility may be a result of chronic headache.
Soft Tissue Mobilizations as a Treatment for a Tension-Type Headache
Background: A tension-type headache (TTH) is the most common form of a headache. The complex interrelation among the various pathophysiological aspects of TTH might explain why this disorder is so
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