Trigeminal Nerve Morphology in Alligator mississippiensis and Its Significance for Crocodyliform Facial Sensation and Evolution

@article{George2013TrigeminalNM,
  title={Trigeminal Nerve Morphology in Alligator mississippiensis and Its Significance for Crocodyliform Facial Sensation and Evolution},
  author={Ian D. George and Casey M Holliday},
  journal={The Anatomical Record},
  year={2013},
  volume={296}
}
Modern crocodylians possess a derived sense of face touch, in which numerous trigeminal nerve‐innervated dome pressure receptors speckle the face and mandible and sense mechanical stimuli. However, the morphological features of this system are not well known, and it remains unclear how the trigeminal system changes during ontogeny and how it scales with other cranial structures. Finally, when this system evolved within crocodyliforms remains a mystery. Thus, new morphological insights into the… Expand
Anatomy and Ontogeny of the Mandibular Symphysis in Alligator mississippiensis
TLDR
The mandibular symphysis anatomy of an ontogenetic series of Alligator mississippiensis is explored using imaging, histology, and whole mount methods to hypothesize a fused Meckel's cartilage offers stiffness in hatchling mandibles prior to the development of organized sutural ligaments and mineralized bone while offering a scaffold for somatic growth. Expand
A 3D Ontogenetic atlas of Alligator Mississippiensis Cranial nerves and their significance for comparative neurology of reptiles.
TLDR
3D models an of the cranial nerves and cranial nerve targets of embryonic, juvenile, and adult American Alligators derived from iodine-contrast CT imaging are shared, for the first time, exploring anatomical patterns of Cranial nerves across ontogeny and revealing the tradeoffs of using contrast-enhanced CT data. Expand
Comparative morphology, morphometry and distribution pattern of the trigeminal nerve branches supplying the bill tip in the ostrich (Struthio camelus) and emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)
TLDR
The large size of the nerve fibres, the high nerve fibre count and the particular distribution of the nerves in the bill tip support the existence of a well-developed sensory area in this region of the ostrich and emu. Expand
Braincase anatomy of the Paleocene crocodyliform Rhabdognathus revealed through high resolution computed tomography
TLDR
Dyrosaurids were highly specialized, largely marine, relatives of living crocodylians, and one of the few archosaur lineages to survive the K-Pg extinction, and now appear to possess neuroanatomical modifications facilitating an agile predatory near-shore ecology. Expand
New Reconstruction of Cranial Musculature in Ornithischian Dinosaurs: Implications for Feeding Mechanisms and Buccal Anatomy
TLDR
Cranomandibular material of ornithischian genera spanning all subclades is reexamined for osteological correlates indicative of intracranial and oral soft tissues and the notion of a novel, unparsimonious “cheek” muscle is rejected, with further discussion of plausible buccal soft tissues. Expand
Paleoneurology of Baurusuchus (Crocodyliformes: Baurusuchidae), ontogenetic variation, brain size, and sensorial implications.
TLDR
This work reconstructed brain endocasts for multiple fossil specimens of the same crocodyliform taxon (Baurusuchus), consisting of complete skulls of two medium sized specimens, one large adult, and a late juvenile, and was able to reconstruct the inner ear anatomy of a fragmentary skull using microtomography. Expand
Complex neuroanatomy in the rostrum of the Isle of Wight theropod Neovenator salerii
TLDR
It is proposed that enlarged neurovascular facial canals shouldn’t be used to exclusively support a model of aquatic foraging in theropods and argue instead that an enhanced degree of facial sensitivity may have been linked with any number of alternative behavioural adaptations, among them defleshing behaviour, nest selection/maintenance or social interaction. Expand
A review of the carotid artery and facial nerve canal systems in extant turtles
TLDR
New insights are provided regarding the carotid circulation and facial nerve innervation systems in a broad set of extant turtles using CT (computed tomography) scans, which allow us to trace the canals these structures form in bone and understand the interaction between both systems. Expand
Neuroanatomy of the spinosaurid Irritator challengeri (Dinosauria: Theropoda) indicates potential adaptations for piscivory
TLDR
Digital models of the neuroanatomical cavities within the braincase of Irritator suggest that the skull table and lateral semicircular canal plane are consistent with fast, downward snatching movements in the act of predation, such as are needed for piscivory. Expand
Archosauriform endocranial morphology and osteological evidence for semiaquatic sensory adaptations in phytosaurs
TLDR
A comparative CT examination of the internal cranial anatomy of Wannia scurriensis, the most basal known parasuchid phytosaur, indicates conserved ecological and functional results of an aquatic lifestyle, and highlight a need for further exploration of endocranial anatomy among Archosauriformes. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 37 REFERENCES
The Relationship Between the Infraorbital Foramen, Infraorbital Nerve, and Maxillary Mechanoreception: Implications for Interpreting the Paleoecology of Fossil Mammals Based on Infraorbital Foramen Size
TLDR
The strong positive correlation between the ION and IOF size suggests that, in the absence of nerve tissue, the IOF can serve as a proxy for ION area, and maybe used to evaluate differences in maxillary mechanoreception in both extinct and extant taxa. Expand
The Epipterygoid of Crocodyliforms and Its Significance for the Evolution of the Orbitotemporal Region of Eusuchians
TLDR
A broad survey of crocodyliform archosaurs and their outgroups was conducted to explore the evolutionary and morphological patterns of the orbitotemporal region, which is a highly apomorphic but poorly understood portion of the head, and indicates that the epipterygoid was only recently eliminated in croc Codyliform evolution. Expand
Structure, innervation and response properties of integumentary sensory organs in crocodilians
TLDR
It is concluded that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws. Expand
Archosaur adductor chamber evolution: Integration of musculoskeletal and topological criteria in jaw muscle homology
TLDR
A new and robust view of jaw muscle homology is provided and the first synthesized nomenclature of sauropsid musculature is introduced using multiple lines of evidence, indicating multiple topological criteria are necessary for interpretations of soft‐tissue homology and warrant further investigation into character congruence and developmental connectivity. Expand
A DYROSAURID CROCODYLIFORM BRAINCASE FROM MALI
Abstract A well-preserved crocodyliform specimen from the Maastrichtian or Paleocene of Mali preserves the braincase and posterior dermatocranium. It is referred to Dyrosauridae on the basis ofExpand
Ontogeny of the Alligator Cartilago Transiliens and Its Significance for Sauropsid Jaw Muscle Evolution
TLDR
The results indicate that similar tendon organs exist among potentially homologous muscle groups in birds and turtles, thus impacting inferences of jaw muscle homology and evolution in sauropsids in general. Expand
Cranial osteology and phylogenetic relationships of Hamadasuchus rebouli (Crocodyliformes: Mesoeucrocodylia) from the Cretaceous of Morocco
TLDR
A detailed description of the skull and part of the mandible of the crocodyliform reptile Hamadasuchus rebouli from the Kem Kem beds of south-eastern Morocco is presented, lending further support to the biogeographical hypothesis that faunal connections existed between Africa and South America well into mid-Cretaceous times. Expand
Hypoglossal Canal Size in Living Hominoids and the Evolution of Human Speech
TLDR
It is concluded that the relative size of the hypoglossal canal is neither a reliable nor sufficient predictor of human-like speech capabilities, and paleoanthropology still lacks a quantifiable, morphological diagnostic for when this capability finally emerged in the human career. Expand
New Insights Into the Brain, Braincase, and Ear Region of Tyrannosaurs (Dinosauria, Theropoda), with Implications for Sensory Organization and Behavior
TLDR
Tyrannosaur sensory biology is consistent with their predatory coelurosaurian heritage, with emphasis on relatively quick, coordinated eye and head movements, and probably sensitive low‐frequency hearing; tyrannosaurs apomorphically enhanced their olfactory apparatus. Expand
A comparative analysis of vibrissa count and infraorbital foramen area in primates and other mammals.
TLDR
Results indicate that primates and dermopterans (Primatomorpha) have smaller IOFs than most non-primate mammals, but they do not have fewer vibrissae, and strepsirrhines and haplorhines do not differ from one another in relative IOF area or vibrissa counts. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...