Tricyclic and related drugs for nocturnal enuresis in children.

@article{Caldwell2016TricyclicAR,
  title={Tricyclic and related drugs for nocturnal enuresis in children.},
  author={Patrina H Y Caldwell and Premala Sureshkumar and Wicky C F Wong},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2016},
  volume={1},
  pages={
          CD002117
        }
}
BACKGROUND Enuresis (bedwetting) affects up to 20% of five year-olds and 2% of adults. Although spontaneous remission often occurs, the social, emotional and psychological costs can be great. Tricyclics have been used to treat enuresis since the 1960s. OBJECTIVES To assess the effects of tricyclic and related drugs compared with other interventions for treating children with enuresis. SEARCH METHODS We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (containing trials… Expand
35 Citations
Alarm interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children.
TLDR
Alarms may reduce the number of wet nights a week in children between 5 and 16 years old and may result in more children achieving complete response than with placebo drugs, but very low-quality evidence means it is uncertain if there are any differences in effectiveness between the other different types of alarm. Expand
Reboxetine in therapy-resistant enuresis: A randomized placebo-controlled study.
TLDR
It is confirmed that reboxetine is an evidence-based alternative to cardiotoxic antidepressant treatment in therapy-resistant enuresis and seems to be an alternative in the treatment of enuretic children who have not responded to standard treatment. Expand
Advances in Treatment of Nocturnal Enuresis in Children
TLDR
The efficacy and safety of different treatments for monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis are discussed, including standard therapies, simple behavioral interventions, complex Behavioral interventions, alarm therapy, desmopressin and other drugs, biofeedback therapy, electrical stimulation, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, and so on. Expand
Desmopressin, Imipramine, and Oxybutynin in the Treatment of Primary Nocturnal Enuresis: A Randomized Clinical Trial
TLDR
There is no significant difference between monotherapy with desmopressin, imipramine or oxybutynin in children with enuresis, however, oxy butynin showed a higher response rate and a lower relapse rate compared to other medications. Expand
Clinical management of nocturnal enuresis
TLDR
Children with NMEN first need treatment of the underlying daytime functional bladder problem before treatment of nocturnal enuresis, and in patients with findings of overactive bladder, anticholinergic drugs may be useful. Expand
The South African guidelines on Enuresis—2017
TLDR
An independent, unbiased, national evaluation and treatment guideline based on the pathophysiological subcategory is proposed using an updated, evidence based approach. Expand
Management and treatment of nocturnal enuresis-an updated standardization document from the International Children's Continence Society.
TLDR
These guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of children with enuresis were updated to update the previous guidelines and evidence-based literature served as the basis, but in areas lacking in primary evidence, expert consensus was used. Expand
Enuresis in children: a case based approach.
TLDR
Treatment of primary monosymptomatic enuresis (i.e., the only symptom is nocturnal bed-wetting in a child who has never been dry) begins with counseling the child and parents on effective behavioral modifications. Expand
Primary Nocturnal Enuresis: A Review
TLDR
The aim of this review was to assemble the pathophysiological background and general information about nocturnal enuresis, a common problem that has multifaceted effects on both the child and the family. Expand
The prognostic value of voiding chart data in therapy-resistant enuresis.
TLDR
In this study no prognostic value was found in anamnestic or voiding chart data in children with therapy resistant enuresis, and not even urgency could predict anticholinergic efficacy. Expand
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Although indomethacin and diclofenac were better than placebo during treatment, they were not as effective as desmopressin and there was a higher chance of adverse effects. Expand
Desmopressin for nocturnal enuresis in children.
TLDR
There was no apparent dose-related effect of desmopressin, but the evidence was limited; there was some evidence that this was not sustained after treatment stopped, and comparison with alternative treatments suggested that desmopressesin was effective in reducing bedwetting. Expand
Complex behavioural and educational interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children.
TLDR
Although DBT and FSHT were better than no treatment when used in combination with an alarm, there was insufficient evidence to support their use without an alarm and there was not enough evidence to judge whether providing educational information about enuresis was effective. Expand
Alarm interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children.
TLDR
Alarm interventions are an effective treatment for nocturnal bedwetting in children, but this effect was not sustained after treatment stopped, and alarms may be more effective in the long term. Expand
Simple behavioural and physical interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children.
TLDR
Simple behavioural methods may be effective for some children, but further trials are needed, in particular in comparison with treatments known to be effective, such as desmopressin, tricyclic drugs and alarms. Expand
Nocturnal enuresis: a placebo controlled trial of two antidepressant drugs.
TLDR
Imipramine was superior to both placebo and mianserin (p < 0.001) in achieving dry nights and reducing wetness scores and would not be a satisfactory alternative treatment for nocturnal enuresis. Expand
Carbamazepine to treat primary nocturnal enuresis: double-blind study.
TLDR
It might be concluded that carbamazepine is useful for treatment of primary nocturnal enuresis after a randomized, double-blind cross-over design study on patients with a history of enURESis. Expand
Complementary and miscellaneous interventions for nocturnal enuresis in children.
BACKGROUND Nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting) is a socially disruptive and stressful condition which affects around 15% to 20% of five year olds, and up to 2% of young adults. OBJECTIVES To assess theExpand
Combined Treatment with Oxybutynin and Imipramine in Enuresis
TLDR
It is suggested that combined imipramine and oxybutynin for primary enuresis is more effective than either drug used alone, and the combined therapy is recommended in enuretic children who are non-responsive to imipramsine or oxy butynin alone. Expand
Examination of the structured withdrawal program to prevent relapse of nocturnal enuresis.
TLDR
The structured withdrawal program significantly reduces relapse rates, and offers an alternative and rapid means of successfully withdrawing medication, as well as understanding the variables related to success. Expand
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