Trichromatic color vision in the salamander (Salamandra salamandra)

@article{Przyrembel2004TrichromaticCV,
  title={Trichromatic color vision in the salamander (Salamandra salamandra)},
  author={C. Przyrembel and B. Keller and Christa Neumeyer},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2004},
  volume={176},
  pages={575-586}
}
Spectral sensitivity functions were measured between 334 nm and 683 nm in Salamandra salamandra by utilizing two behavioral reactions: the negative phototactic response, and the prey catching behavior elicited by a moving worm dummy. [...] Key Result The action spectrum of the negative phototactic response revealed 3 pronounced maxima: at 360–400 nm, at 520–540 nm, and at 600–640 nm. In the range around 450 nm, there was a “reaction gap” where sensitivity could not be measured.Expand
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TLDR
Large field motion detection in goldfish, measured in the optomotor response, is based on the L-cone type, and is therefore color-blind, and the same holds for the detection of a small moving object.
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T tiger salamanders’ (Ambystoma tigrinum) learning to execute a response within a maze as proximal visual cue conditions varied suggests that salamander learn to execute responses over learning to use visual cues but can useVisual cues if required.
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