Trends in the incidence of cancer in Kampala, Uganda 1991–2010

@article{Wabinga2014TrendsIT,
  title={Trends in the incidence of cancer in Kampala, Uganda 1991–2010},
  author={H. Wabinga and S. Nambooze and Phoebe Mary Amulen and C. Okello and L. Mbus and D. Parkin},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2014},
  volume={135}
}
  • H. Wabinga, S. Nambooze, +3 authors D. Parkin
  • Published 2014
  • Medicine, Geography
  • International Journal of Cancer
  • The Kampala cancer registry is the longest established in Africa. [...] Key Result In the 1960s cancer of the oesophagus was the most common cancer of men (and second in women), and incidence in the last 20 years has not declined. Cancer of the cervix, always the most frequent cancer of women, has shown an increase over the period (1.8% per year), although the rates appear to have declined in the last 4 years.Expand Abstract
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