Trends in health care spending for immigrants in the United States.

@article{Stimpson2010TrendsIH,
  title={Trends in health care spending for immigrants in the United States.},
  author={Jim P Stimpson and Fernando A Wilson and Karl Eschbach},
  journal={Health affairs},
  year={2010},
  volume={29 3},
  pages={
          544-50
        }
}
The suspected burden that undocumented immigrants may place on the U.S. health care system has been a flashpoint in health care and immigration reform debates. An examination of health care spending during 1999-2006 for adult naturalized citizens and immigrant noncitizens (which includes some undocumented immigrants) finds that the cost of providing health care to immigrants is lower than that of providing care to U.S. natives and that immigrants are not contributing disproportionately to high… 

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