Trends in Sex Ratios of Turtles in the United States : Implications of Road Mortality

@inproceedings{Gibbs2005TrendsIS,
  title={Trends in Sex Ratios of Turtles in the United States : Implications of Road Mortality},
  author={James P. Gibbs and David A Steen},
  year={2005}
}
Road mortality has been implicated as a significant demographic force in turtles, particularly for females, which are killed disproportionately on overland nesting movements. Moreover, the United States’ road network has expanded dramatically over the last century. We therefore predicted that historical trends in sex ratios of turtle populations would be male biased. To test this prediction, we synthesized published estimates of population-level sex ratios in freshwater and terrestrial turtles… CONTINUE READING
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