Trends in Arctic sea ice extent from CMIP5, CMIP3 and observations

@article{Stroeve2012TrendsIA,
  title={Trends in Arctic sea ice extent from CMIP5, CMIP3 and observations},
  author={Julienne Christine Stroeve and Vladimir M. Kattsov and Andrew P. Barrett and Mark C. Serreze and Tatiana Pavlova and Marika M. Holland and Walter N. Meier},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2012},
  volume={39}
}
The rapid retreat and thinning of the Arctic sea ice cover over the past several decades is one of the most striking manifestations of global climate change. Previous research revealed that the observed downward trend in September ice extent exceeded simulated trends from most models participating in the World Climate Research Programme Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 3 (CMIP3). We show here that as a group, simulated trends from the models contributing to CMIP5 are more consistent… 

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