Tregs control the development of symptomatic West Nile virus infection in humans and mice.

@article{Lanteri2009TregsCT,
  title={Tregs control the development of symptomatic West Nile virus infection in humans and mice.},
  author={Marion Christine Lanteri and Katie M O'Brien and Whitney E. Purtha and Mark J Cameron and Jennifer M Lund and Rachel E Owen and John W. Heitman and Brian Custer and Dale F Hirschkorn and Leslie H. H. Tobler and Nancy E Kiely and Harry E. Prince and Lishomwa C. Ndhlovu and Douglas F Nixon and Hany T Kamel and David Joseph Kelvin and Michael P. Busch and Alexander Yu Rudensky and Michael S Diamond and Phillip J Norris},
  journal={The Journal of clinical investigation},
  year={2009},
  volume={119 11},
  pages={3266-77}
}
West Nile virus (WNV) causes asymptomatic infection in most humans, but for undefined reasons, approximately 20% of immunocompetent individuals develop West Nile fever, a potentially debilitating febrile illness, and approximately 1% develop neuroinvasive disease syndromes. Notably, since its emergence in 1999, WNV has become the leading cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in North America. We hypothesized that CD4+ Tregs might be differentially regulated in subjects with symptomatic compared… CONTINUE READING