Treatment with low doses of cabergoline is not associated with increased prevalence of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with hyperprolactinaemia

@article{Bogazzi2008TreatmentWL,
  title={Treatment with low doses of cabergoline is not associated with increased prevalence of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with hyperprolactinaemia},
  author={Fausto Bogazzi and Simona Buralli and Luca Manetti and Valentina Raffaelli and Tullio Cigni and Massimo Lombardi and F. Boresi and Stefano Taddei and Alessandra Salvetti and Enio Martino},
  journal={International Journal of Clinical Practice},
  year={2008},
  volume={62}
}
Introduction and aim:  Dopamine agonists have been reported to increase the risk of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, it is unknown whether these drugs might be harmful for patients with hyperprolactinaemia (HyperPRL). The aim of the study was to evaluate whether HyperPRL patients treated with dopamine agonists had a higher prevalence of cardiac valves regurgitation than that of general population. 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Assessment of cardiac valve dysfunction in patients receiving cabergoline treatment for hyperprolactinaemia
TLDR
This study examined whether cabergoline treatment of hyperprolactinaemia is associated with a greater prevalence of valvulopathy.
Valvular heart disease and the use of cabergoline for the treatment of prolactinoma
Objective  The use of high doses of the ergot‐derived dopamine agonist cabergoline (> 3 mg/day), especially with cumulative doses > 4000 mg, has been associated with an increase in cardiac valvular
Cabergoline therapy and the risk of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with hyperprolactinemia: A metaanalysis from clinical studies
TLDR
It is indicated that echocardiography is recommended in all patients with hyperprolactinemia who are candidate to be treated with or are under cabergoline therapy; monitoring cardiac valves is also recommended although precise follow-up for these patients will be likely provided by future longitudinal studies.
Gender effects on cardiac valvular function in hyperprolactinaemic patients receiving cabergoline: a retrospective study
TLDR
This data indicates that lower doses of cabergoline used to treat prolactinomas withErgot‐derived dopamine agonists are associated with increased risk of valvular dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease.
Cabergoline and cardiac valve disease in prolactinoma patients: additional studies during long-term treatment are required.
TLDR
There is a need for larger, preferably prospective, studies with careful echocardiographic assessment and with longer durations of follow-up than the currently available studies, to raise concern about the safety of the use of cabergoline in the long-term treatment of prolactinomas.
Long-term cabergoline therapy is not associated with valvular heart disease in patients with prolactinomas
TLDR
Low doses of cabergoline seem to be a safe treatment of hyperprolactinemic patients with prolactinomas, however, in patients with prolonged Cabergoline treatment, it is suggested that echocardiographic surveillance may be warranted.
No clinically significant valvular regurgitation in long‐term cabergoline treatment for prolactinoma
An association between treatment for Parkinson's disease with certain dopaminergic drugs and development of cardiac valve impairment has been reported. Recent studies in hyperprolactinaemic patients
Low dose cabergoline for hyperprolactinaemia is not associated with clinically significant valvular heart disease.
TLDR
Cabergoline at doses sufficient to suppress hyperprolactinaemia for a period of 3-4 years is not associated with an increased risk of clinically significant valvular regurgitation.
Risk of Cardiac Valve Regurgitation with Dopamine Agonist use in Parkinson’s Disease and Hyperprolactinaemia
TLDR
Ergot-derived dopamine agonists are associated with an increased risk of CVR in Parkinson’s disease but not in hyperprolactinaemia patients.
Cabergoline therapy for prolactinomas: is valvular heart disease a real safety concern?
TLDR
The clinical significance of the present findings has yet to be confirmed by future larger prospective studies with rigorous echocardiographic protocols and prolonged duration of follow-up, but one study found an increased rate of moderate tricuspid regurgitation.
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TLDR
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