Treatment of the Acute Traumatic Acromioclavicular Separation

@article{Bishop2006TreatmentOT,
  title={Treatment of the Acute Traumatic Acromioclavicular Separation},
  author={Julie Y. Bishop and Christopher C. Kaeding},
  journal={Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review},
  year={2006},
  volume={14},
  pages={237-245}
}
Injuries to the acromioclavicular joint occur commonly in athletes, especially those involved in contact sports. The majority of these injuries are type I and II acromioclavicular joint separations and are treated nonoperatively with rehabilitation. A rapid and full return to play is expected. Acute types IV, V, and VI are less common and operative intervention is recommended. The type III injury is more controversial and current trends are towards initial nonoperative management. Operative… 
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TLDR
A simple and reliable mode of fixation, performed arthroscopically with a metallic anchor loaded with a braided polyfilament suture, a strong and reliable fixation of the clavicle to the coracoid process is obtained.
Arthroscopic fixation of type III acromioclavicular dislocations.
TLDR
A simple and reliable mode of fixation, performed arthroscopically with a metallic anchor loaded with a braided polyfilament suture, a strong and reliable fixation of the clavicle to the coracoid process is obtained.
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