Treatment of severe chronic idiopathic urticaria with oral mycophenolate mofetil in patients not responding to antihistamines and/or corticosteroids

@article{Shahar2006TreatmentOS,
  title={Treatment of severe chronic idiopathic urticaria with oral mycophenolate mofetil in patients not responding to antihistamines and/or corticosteroids},
  author={Eduardo Shahar and Reuven Bergman and Emma Guttman‐Yassky and Shimon Pollack},
  journal={International Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2006},
  volume={45}
}
Background  Urticarial patients are usually treated with oral antihistamines and 50% respond well to this treatment; however, the other 50% do not respond to antihistamines and need a more aggressive approach, such as short or prolonged courses of oral corticosteroids or cyclosporine. Potential adverse effects, however, limit this regimen. 
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  • The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice
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