Treatment of pulmonary embolism: The use of low-molecular-weight heparin in the inpatient and outpatient settings.

@article{Hull2008TreatmentOP,
  title={Treatment of pulmonary embolism: The use of low-molecular-weight heparin in the inpatient and outpatient settings.},
  author={Russell Douglas Hull},
  journal={Thrombosis and haemostasis},
  year={2008},
  volume={99 3},
  pages={
          502-10
        }
}
  • R. Hull
  • Published 2008
  • Medicine
  • Thrombosis and haemostasis
Pulmonary embolism (PE) remains a major clinical problem associated with considerable mortality and morbidity. In patients with PE, appropriate anticoagulant therapy has been shown to significantly reduce both recurrence and mortality. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is at least as effective as unfractionated heparin (UFH) in the treatment of PE, with a similar risk of bleeding. Furthermore, LMWH offers more predictable pharmacokinetics and anticoagulant effects. As a result, current… Expand
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TLDR
For inpatient treatment of PE, the use of LMWH is cost-effective compared to UFH and early discharge or outpatient treatment in suitable patients with PE would lead to substantial cost savings. Expand
Pulmonary Embolism in Medical Patients: Improved Diagnosis and the Role of Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin in Prevention and Treatment
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Clinicians must be attentive to the symptoms and signs that would indicate a PE and appropriate treatment based on the clinical status of the patient with either LMWH or body-weight dose-adjusted UFH is indicated. Expand
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Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) rather than unfractionated hepar in pulmonary embolism should be used whenever possible for the initial inpatient treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), and anticoagulation should be maintained for 3 to 6 months for VTE secondary to transient risk factors and for more than 12 months for recurrent VTE. Expand
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Outpatient use of tinzaparin during transition to warfarin therapy in the treatment of VTE, including PE, appears to be feasible in patients who are judged candidates for home therapy. Expand
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TLDR
Low-molecular-weight heparin administered once daily subcutaneously was no less effective and probably more effective than use of dose-adjusted intravenous unfractionated heparIn for preventing recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with PE and associated proximal deep vein thrombosis. Expand
Early discharge and home supervision of patients with pulmonary embolism treated with low-molecular weight heparin.
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Early discharge home for stable patients with PE treated with LMWH (tinzaparin) is feasible, effective and safe, provided that patients are clinically stable, accessible by phone, receive daily administration of LMWH and have their international normalised ratio (INR) monitored. Expand
A Randomized Trial Comparing 2 Low-Molecular-Weight Heparins for the Outpatient Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism
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