Treatment of lichen sclerosus with antibiotics

@article{Shelley2006TreatmentOL,
  title={Treatment of lichen sclerosus with antibiotics},
  author={WalterB. Shelley and E. Dorinda Shelley and Cristine V Amurao},
  journal={International Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2006},
  volume={45}
}
Current therapy for lichen sclerosus centers on topical steroids, particularly clobetasol propionate. As some evidence suggests an infectious etiology owing to Borrelia, we studied the effect of penicillin and cephalosporin therapy on patients with lichen sclerosus who had responded poorly to treatment with potent topical corticosteroids. 
Lichen sclerosus et atrophicans, scleroderma en coup de sabre and Lyme borreliosis
TLDR
This case stresses the importance of identifying clinical manifestations associated with Lyme disease and the use of tissue PCR to detect borrelial DNA in patients with these lesions, but characterized by negative serology for Borrelia. Expand
Extensive anogenital lichen sclerosus with vaginal stenosis: A case report
TLDR
A case of a woman affected by extensive anogenital lichen sclerosus complicated with vaginal stenosis is described, usually affecting skin, particularly genital region. Expand
Borrelia in granuloma annulare, morphea and lichen sclerosus: a PCR‐based study and review of the literature
TLDR
Examination of skin biopsies of morphea, GA and LSA by PCR is examined to assess the prevalence of Borrelia DNA in an endemic area and to compare the results with data in the literature. Expand
Treatment of genital lichen sclerosus in women--review.
TLDR
This review aims to analyze available literature on the treatment of this disease entity and take into consideration Genetic, infectious, hormonal factors and autoimmune mechanisms are taken into consideration. Expand
Treatment of genital lichen sclerosus in women - review
TLDR
This review aims to analyze available literature on the treatment of this disease entity and take into consideration Genetic, infectious, hormonal factors and autoimmune mechanisms are taken into consideration. Expand
Diagnosis and management of cutaneous and anogenital lichen sclerosus: recommendations from the Italian Society of Dermatology (SIDeMaST).
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Surgical treatment has become the treatment of choice in male genital LS with persistent phimosis not responsive to medical treatment and the highest level of evidence favors the use of topical high potency corticosteroids. Expand
Extragenital lichen sclerosus with aetiological link to Borrelia.
TLDR
A case of extragenital lichen sclerosus with varied morphological features and probable aetiological link to Borrelia is presented, affecting women 10 times more commonly than men and usually seen over 50 years of age. Expand
Treatment Options in Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus: A Scoping Review
TLDR
Effective treatments such as high-potency topical steroids are now the standard of care and first-line treatment in women with VLS and follow-up in specialist clinics is recommended. Expand
The expanding spectrum of cutaneous borreliosis.
  • K. Eisendle, B. Zelger
  • Medicine
  • Giornale italiano di dermatologia e venereologia : organo ufficiale, Societa italiana di dermatologia e sifilografia
  • 2009
TLDR
Evidence is growing that at least in part also other skin manifestations, especially morphea, lichen sclerosus and cases of cutaneous B-cell lymphoma are causally related to infections with Borrelia. Expand
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