Treatment of female pattern hair loss with oral antiandrogens

@article{Sinclair2005TreatmentOF,
  title={Treatment of female pattern hair loss with oral antiandrogens},
  author={Rodney Daniel Sinclair and M E Wewerinke and Damian Jolley},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2005},
  volume={152}
}
Background  It has not been conclusively established that female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is either due to androgens or responsive to oral antiandrogen therapy. 
Antiandrogen Therapy for Female-Pattern Hair Loss
Female-pattern hair loss (FPHL) may present as diffuse reduction in hair density on the crown, increased telogen-hair shedding, or both. Chronic shedding is characteristic of chronic telogenExpand
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TLDR
A woman whose hair loss progressed while using spironolactone and topical minoxidil in combination, but reversed with flutamide, a potent androgen receptor antagonist is reported. Expand
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TLDR
Therapeutic regimen is often challenging and requires multiple combinations of topical, systemic, and interventional therapies to control hair loss and produce satisfactory hair regrowth. Expand
5 mg/day finasteride treatment for normoandrogenic Asian women with female pattern hair loss
  • J. Yeon, J. Y. Jung, +4 authors C. Huh
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV
  • 2011
TLDR
Clinical efficacy offinasteride in treating FPHL is still in controversy, but there is a tendency to high dose finasteride, which is more effective than lower dose. Expand
Female pattern hair loss: a pilot study investigating combination therapy with low‐dose oral minoxidil and spironolactone
  • R. Sinclair
  • Medicine
  • International journal of dermatology
  • 2018
TLDR
Minoxidil and spironolactone are oral antihypertensives known to stimulate hair growth and may be useful in combination with other drugs to reduce the risk of hair loss. Expand
Antiandrogen therapy for skin and hair disease.
TLDR
Several medications that work through a variety of different mechanisms may be prescribed safely and effectively as antiandrogen therapies in the dermatology arena. Expand
Systemic therapy of androgenic alopecia
The article describes the literature sources related to the efficacy of systemic therapy of androgenic alopecia in female and male.
Treatment of female pattern hair loss with a combination of spironolactone and minoxidil
TLDR
A 53‐year‐old woman with clinical evidence of female pattern hair loss and histological evidence of androgenetic alopecia was initially treated with the oral antiandrogen spironolactone 200 mg daily, but the hair regrowth plateaued and at 24 months there had been no further improvement in hair density. Expand
Successful treatment of female‐pattern hair loss with spironolactone in a 9‐year‐old girl
A 9‐year‐old prepubertal girl with female pattern hair loss treated with spironolactone 100 mg orally per day had objective improvement demonstrated by regrowth observed clinically and on comparisonExpand
Nonsurgical therapy for hair loss.
TLDR
The currently available options for medical therapies to treat androgenetic alopecia in men and women are updated and emerging novel therapeutic modalities with potential for treating these patients are discussed. Expand
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References

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Androgenetic alopecia in men and women.
All men and women suffer androgenic hair loss as they age. Androgenic alopecia becomes a problem only when the hair loss is perceived as excessive, premature and distressing.
Women who present with female pattern hair loss tend to underestimate the severity of their hair loss
TLDR
The hypothesis was that women with FPHL who seek treatment would rate their condition as more severe than would their treating doctors. Expand
Diffuse female hair loss: are androgens necessary?
TLDR
The case of a young woman with hypopituitarism who presented with the clinical and histological features of female androgenetic alopecia in the absence of detectable levels of circulating androgens or other signs of postpubertal androgenization is reported, showing that this pattern of hair loss is not necessarily androgen dependent. Expand
USE OF TOPICAL MINOXIDIL THERAPY FOR ANDROGENETIC ALOPECIA IN WOMEN
TLDR
This study focuses on the treatment of hair loss in women withAndrogenetic alopecia, which begins as a diffuse and progressive thinning of the frontoparietal area of the scalp in women. Expand
Androgenetic alopecia in men aged 40–69 years: prevalence and risk factors
TLDR
This poster focuses on the epidemiology of androgenetic alopecia, a disease with a strong genetic basis that has long been identified but little is known of its non‐genetic causes. Expand
Effective medical treatment for common baldness in women
TLDR
Endocrine profiles were established in nineteen women, aged 18–43 years, with common baldness, finding reduced plasma levels in SHBG, luteal phase progesterone, LH, oestradiol, and FSH indicating sub‐fertility, while plasma total testosterone was raised in only one patient. Expand
Hair loss in women with hyperandrogenism: four cases responding to finasteride.
TLDR
The finding that finasteride treatment improves pattern hair loss in women with hyperandrogenism but does not affect those postmenopausal women with female patternhair loss without hyperandrogensism supports the concept that not all types of female hair loss have the same pathophysiology. Expand
Effects of minoxidil 2% vs. cyproterone acetate treatment on female androgenetic alopecia: a controlled, 12‐month randomized trial
TLDR
A small number of studies have demonstrated the androgen‐dependent character of female androgenetic alopecia, but there have been few controlled studies of therapies for alopECia in women. Expand
There is no clear association between low serum ferritin and chronic diffuse telogen hair loss
TLDR
Estimation of serum ferritin is recommended as part of the initial assessment when women present with chronic diffuse telogen hair loss, and iron supplementation therapy is commonly recommended for those found to have low iron stores. Expand
Patterned androgenic alopecia in women.
TLDR
Patterned hair loss in women is commoner than hitherto described, particularly after the menopause, and in the absence of other signs of virilization, "male-pattern" hair loss would appear to be a poor indicator of gross abnormality of androgen metabolism. Expand
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