Treatment of convulsive and nonconvulsive status epilepticus

@article{Pang2005TreatmentOC,
  title={Treatment of convulsive and nonconvulsive status epilepticus},
  author={Trudy D Pang and Lawrence J. Hirsch},
  journal={Current Treatment Options in Neurology},
  year={2005},
  volume={7},
  pages={247-259}
}
Opinion statementStatus epilepticus (SE) should be treated as quickly as possible with full doses of medications as detailed in a written hospital protocol. Lorazepam is the drug of choice for initial treatment. If intravenous access is not immediately available, then rectal diazepam or nasal or buccal midazolam should be given. Prehospital treatment of seizures by emergency personnel is effective and safe, and may prevent cases of refractory SE. Home treat-ment of prolonged seizures or… 
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