Treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease by posterior GPi pallidotomy: 1‐year results of a pilot study

@article{Baron1996TreatmentOA,
  title={Treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease by posterior GPi pallidotomy: 1‐year results of a pilot study},
  author={Mark S. Baron and Jerrold L. Vitek and Joanne Green and Yoshiki Kaneoke and Takao Hashimoto and Robert S. Turner and John L. Woodard and Mahlon R. Delong and Roy A. E. Bakay and Steven A. Cole and William M. McDonald},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={1996},
  volume={40}
}
The effects of posterior internal pallidal ablation (GPi pallidotomy) on parkinsonian signs and symptoms were studied in 15 patients with medically intracally intractable Parkinson's disease(PD). The sensorimotor territory of the internal portion of the globus pallidus and the adjacent optic tract and internal capsule were identified with microelectrode recording and stimulation. Radiofrequency lesions were then created in the identified sensorimotor territory. Pallidotomy significantly… 
Treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease by unilateral posterior GPi pallidotomy: 4‐year results of a pilot study
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The results of patient self‐assessments suggest that 4 years after unilateral pallidotomy, most patients continue to experience a quality of life above preoperative levels.
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  • J. Vatz, D. M.
  • Medicine
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  • 2001
TLDR
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Mild-to-moderate degrees of cortical atrophy, ventriculomegaly, and ischemic encephalopathy do not predispose patients to less favorable outcomes following unilateral pallidotomy, and patients with both status cribriformis and lacunes have a higher risk of transient side effects; however, these patients should not be denied surgical treatment.
Assessment of motor function after stereotactic pallidotomy
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It is concluded that pallidotomy is a safe and effective treatment of parkinsonian symptoms, many of which improve bilaterally, including contralateral tremor, gait, and arising from a chair.
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It is concluded that unilateral subthalamotomy results in moderate improvement in all aspects of parkinsonian features, allows reduction in the dose of levodopa required, and ameliorates drug‐induced complications throughout 12‐month assessments.
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