Treatment of Parkinson’s disease by cortical stimulation

@article{Lefaucheur2009TreatmentOP,
  title={Treatment of Parkinson’s disease by cortical stimulation},
  author={J. P. Lefaucheur},
  journal={Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics},
  year={2009},
  volume={9},
  pages={1755 - 1771}
}
  • J. Lefaucheur
  • Published 1 December 2009
  • Biology, Psychology, Medicine
  • Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Opportunities for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) by cortical stimulation are open. This review outlines the main arguments for the use of cortical stimulation in PD: the widespread cortical dysfunction that could be corrected by cortical stimulation; the main mechanism of action of subthalamic nucleus stimulation that could take place within the primary motor cortex; and the ability of cortical stimulation to modulate basal ganglia activity by exciting cortico–basal ganglia… 
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  • Biology, Psychology
    Neurophysiologie Clinique/Clinical Neurophysiology
  • 2009
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