Treatment of Myasthenia Gravis

@article{Kumar2011TreatmentOM,
  title={Treatment of Myasthenia Gravis},
  author={Vikas S. Kumar and Henry J. Kaminski},
  journal={Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports},
  year={2011},
  volume={11},
  pages={89-96}
}
Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an antibody-mediated, neuromuscular transmission disorder, which ranges in clinical manifestations of ocular myasthenia that may be visually disabling to myasthenic crisis with patients suffering life-threatening respiratory insufficiency. MG also has pathophysiologic subgroups based on presence or absence of acetylcholine receptor or muscle-specific kinase antibodies and presence of thymoma. Cholinesterase inhibitors partially improve weakness, but the vast majority… Expand
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TLDR
Current knowledge of MG is explored to explore potential causes of the disease and provide numerous hypotheses directed at future research. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The practical aspects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy in MG are critically reviewed in this article. Expand
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TLDR
The prevalence of clinical exacerbation following CS treatment, its’ severity and relation to the type and dose of CS are determined, and the rate of MG exacerbation is highest with the administration of cortisone, intermediate with prednisone, and lowest with methylprednisolone. Expand
Unilateral extended thoracoscopic thymectomy for nontumoral myasthenia gravis--a new standard.
TLDR
A review of the experience of unilateral extended thoracoscopic thymectomy for nontumoral MG, a technique that could became a new standard in the complex management of MG treatment. Expand
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