Treating Critical Illness: The Importance of First Doing No Harm

@article{Singer2005TreatingCI,
  title={Treating Critical Illness: The Importance of First Doing No Harm},
  author={Mervyn Singer and Paul Glynne},
  journal={PLoS Medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={2},
  pages={61 - 467}
}
0497 T he Battle of Trafalgar was a short-lasting but bloody affair. By the end of the afternoon of 21 October 1805, the French/ Spanish fl eet had lost 4,408 men, and a further 2,545 were wounded while the victorious British force suffered 455 dead and 1,242 wounded [1]. The British fl agship HMS Victory, where Admiral Horatio Nelson lost his life to a sniper's bullet, sustained 56 other deaths. The surgeon on board, Dr. William Beatty, also listed 102 wounded sailors who survived the battle… CONTINUE READING