Traumatic brain injury: cause or risk of Alzheimer’s disease? A review of experimental studies

@article{Szczygielski2005TraumaticBI,
  title={Traumatic brain injury: cause or risk of Alzheimer’s disease? A review of experimental studies},
  author={Jacek Szczygielski and Angelika E. M. Mautes and Wolf-Ingo Steudel and Peter G Falkai and Thomas A. Bayer and Oliver Wirths},
  journal={Journal of Neural Transmission},
  year={2005},
  volume={112},
  pages={1547-1564}
}
Summary.Traumatic Brain Injury is the leading cause of death and disability among young individuals in our society. Moreover, according to some epidemiological studies, head trauma is one of the most potent environmental risk factors for subsequent development of Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, pathological features that are present also in Alzheimer’s disease (in particular deposition of beta-amyloid protein) were observed in traumatised brains already a few hours after the initial insult… 

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