Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.

@article{Cantu2015TraumaticBI,
  title={Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.},
  author={David Cantu and Kendall R. Walker and Lauren Andresen and Amaro Taylor-Weiner and David W. Hampton and Giuseppina Tesco and Chris G. Dulla},
  journal={Cerebral cortex},
  year={2015},
  volume={25 8},
  pages={
          2306-20
        }
}
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors… Expand
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