Trauma, Genes, and the Neurobiology of Personality Disorders

@article{Goodman2004TraumaGA,
  title={Trauma, Genes, and the Neurobiology of Personality Disorders},
  author={Marianne S. Goodman and Antonia S. New and Larry J. Siever},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={1032}
}
Abstract: A model for personality dysfunction posits an interaction between inherited susceptibility and environmental factors such as childhood trauma. Core biological vulnerabilities in personality include dimensions of affective instability, impulsive aggression, and cognition/perceptual domains. For the dimension of impulsive aggression, often seen in borderline personality disorder (BPD), the underlying neurobiology involves deficits in central serotonin function and alterations in… 
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