Transposition of the great arteries in the newborn: A three year survey

@article{Lam1978TranspositionOT,
  title={Transposition of the great arteries in the newborn: A three year survey},
  author={L. Lam and P. McCann and O. C. Ward},
  journal={Irish Journal of Medical Science},
  year={1978},
  volume={147},
  pages={267-271}
}
SummaryForty-seven cases of transposition of the great arteries (TGA) are reviewed. The 6 month survival rate is 66%. The associated cardiac lesions are described. At least 50% of all TGA would be suitable for the Mustard operation. It would appear that not all babies born with TGA are referred for balloon atrial septostomy 
1 Citations
Fate of infants with transposition of the great arteries in relation to balloon atrial septostomy.
The palliation afforded by balloon atrial septostomy to 124 infants with transposition of the great arteries was assessed in terms of survival to 6 months of age without the need for furtherExpand

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TLDR
T he infant born with transposition of the great vessels rarely survives the first year of life and partial procedures leave one with a handicapped child. Expand
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Three cases of thrombosis of the inferior vena cava following balloon atrial septostomy for transposition of the great arteries are described and attention is drawn to the silent presentation and practical importance of this complication. Expand
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In 1,145 autopsies performed on children with congenital heart disease who died before the age of 4, 180 were found to have a completely transposed aorta and pulmonary artery, finding diagnostic and therapeutic problems chiefly arise during the first months of life in patients with complete transposition of the great vessels. Expand
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It is concluded that balloon atrial septostomy is initially effective and relatively safe, but that, particularly in those with intact ventricular septum, surgical septectomy is often required. Expand
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The results demonstrate that effective palliation of transposition of the great arteries, with or without associated ventricular septal defect, can be provided rapidly and safely by balloon atrioseptostomy. Expand
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