• Corpus ID: 231632319

Transportation CO$_2$ emissions stayed high despite recurrent COVID outbreaks

@inproceedings{Wang2021TransportationCE,
  title={Transportation CO\$\_2\$ emissions stayed high despite recurrent COVID outbreaks},
  author={Yilong Wang and Zhu Deng and Philippe Ciais and Zhu Liu and Steven J. Davis and Pierre Gentine and Thomas Lauvaux and Quan-sheng Ge},
  year={2021}
}
After steep drops and then rebounds in transportation-related CO$_2$ emissions over the first half of 2020, a second wave of COVID-19 this fall has caused further -- but less substantial -- emissions reductions. Here, we use near-real-time estimates of daily emissions to explore differences in human behavior and restriction policies over the course of 2020. 

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