Transport mode choice and body mass index: Cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence from a European-wide study.

@article{Dons2018TransportMC,
  title={Transport mode choice and body mass index: Cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence from a European-wide study.},
  author={Evi Dons and David Rojas-Rueda and Esther Anaya-Boig and Ione Avila-Palencia and Christian Brand and Tom Cole-Hunter and Audrey de Nazelle and Ulf Eriksson and Mailin Gaupp-Berghausen and Regine Gerike and Sonja Kahlmeier and Michelle Laeremans and Natalie Mueller and Tim S. Nawrot and Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen and Juan Orjuela and Francesca Racioppi and Elisabeth Raser and Arnout Standaert and Luc Int Panis and Thomas G{\"o}tschi},
  journal={Environment international},
  year={2018},
  volume={119},
  pages={
          109-116
        }
}

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