Transplants from balding and hairy androgenetic alopecia scalp regrow hair comparably well on immunodeficient mice.

@article{Krajcik2003TransplantsFB,
  title={Transplants from balding and hairy androgenetic alopecia scalp regrow hair comparably well on immunodeficient mice.},
  author={Rozlyn A. Krajcik and Joseph H. Vogelman and Virginia L. Malloy and Norman Orentreich},
  journal={Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology},
  year={2003},
  volume={48 5},
  pages={
          752-9
        }
}
Human hair follicles were grafted onto 2 strains of immunodeficient mice to compare the regeneration potential of vellus (miniaturized, balding) and terminal (hairy, nonbalding) follicles from males and a female exhibiting pattern baldness. Each mouse had transplants of both types of follicles from a single donor for direct comparison. Grafted follicles from 2 male donors resulted in nonsignificant differences in mean length (52 mm vs 54 mm) and mean diameter (99 microm vs 93 microm) at 22… 

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