Transoceanic drift and the domestication of African bottle gourds in the Americas.

@article{Kistler2014TransoceanicDA,
  title={Transoceanic drift and the domestication of African bottle gourds in the Americas.},
  author={Logan Kistler and {\'A}lvaro Montenegro and Bruce D. Smith and John A. Gifford and Richard E. Green and Lee A. Newsom and Beth Shapiro},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2014},
  volume={111 8},
  pages={
          2937-41
        }
}
Bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) was one of the first domesticated plants, and the only one with a global distribution during pre-Columbian times. Although native to Africa, bottle gourd was in use by humans in east Asia, possibly as early as 11,000 y ago (BP) and in the Americas by 10,000 BP. Despite its utilitarian importance to diverse human populations, it remains unresolved how the bottle gourd came to be so widely distributed, and in particular how and when it arrived in the New World… CONTINUE READING

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