Transmission of Multiple Traditions within and between Chimpanzee Groups

@article{Whiten2007TransmissionOM,
  title={Transmission of Multiple Traditions within and between Chimpanzee Groups},
  author={Andrew Whiten and Antoine Spiteri and Victoria Horner and Kristin E. Bonnie and Susan P. Lambeth and Steven J. Schapiro and FRANS B. M. Waal},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={17},
  pages={1038-1043}
}
Field reports provide increasing evidence for local behavioral traditions among fish, birds, and mammals. These findings are significant for evolutionary biology because social learning affords faster adaptation than genetic change and has generated new (cultural) forms of evolution. Orangutan and chimpanzee field studies suggest that like humans, these apes are distinctive among animals in each exhibiting over 30 local traditions. However, direct evidence is lacking in apes and, with the… Expand
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