Transient Vibrations Caused by Heel Strike

@article{Smeathers1989TransientVC,
  title={Transient Vibrations Caused by Heel Strike},
  author={James Smeathers},
  journal={Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine},
  year={1989},
  volume={203},
  pages={181 - 186}
}
  • J. Smeathers
  • Published 1 December 1989
  • Geology
  • Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine
Transient vibrations caused by heel strike and travelling vertically through the body have been monitored using accelerometers taped to the skin. A correction for skin movement based on the transmissibility function is described. The average velocity between the foot and the head for the heel-strike transient is 220 m/s. This velocity is greatest in the legs, 610 m/s, and least in the spine, 90 m/s. Shock absorption occurs mainly in the legs and to a lesser degree in the spine. 

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The authors' hypothesis is that this results from the rapid deceleration of a mass (the ‘effective foot’) under forces which compress the heel pad, and the relationship between the foot strike and the shock wave, which it generates.
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