Transfer of carbohydrate-active enzymes from marine bacteria to Japanese gut microbiota

@article{Hehemann2010TransferOC,
  title={Transfer of carbohydrate-active enzymes from marine bacteria to Japanese gut microbiota},
  author={Jan-Hendrik Hehemann and Ga{\"e}lle Correc and Tristan Barbeyron and William Helbert and Mirjam Czjzek and Gurvan Michel},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={464},
  pages={908-912}
}
Gut microbes supply the human body with energy from dietary polysaccharides through carbohydrate active enzymes, or CAZymes, which are absent in the human genome. These enzymes target polysaccharides from terrestrial plants that dominated diet throughout human evolution. The array of CAZymes in gut microbes is highly diverse, exemplified by the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, which contains 261 glycoside hydrolases and polysaccharide lyases, as well as 208 homologues of susC… Expand
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